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This Bios Is Not For Your Notebook PC" workaround please.
#1
Question 
I have an Acer Aspire 5733z laptop which is only a year old. And I would like to see if there is a workaround to get past this annoying message saying "this bios is not for your notebook pc." Because I bet that there is a way to get past this annoying message. Because I really want to download the bios from the Aspire 5742G model. But of course when I get to the Insyde flash screen with the cartoon character, it says "This Bios Is not for Your Notebook PC." Is there a workaround to this?


Because this has to do something with the bios ID or bios string, I believe. Like how do I change that bios ID or string? That's what I would like to know more in details. Can I configure, and change or edit the bios ID in my Insyde flash "platform.ini" file? Is that possible? If it is, please explain this to me more in details. And please do not tell me to only flash my original bios for my Aspire 5733Z.



Because I really do believe that there is a way to not make that "This bios is not for your notebook PC" message go away. Well anyway, please get back to me as soon as possible. And please let me know the procedure on how to do this, very carfully, so I can understand it clearly. I mean this should for almost every bios, only with the Insyde bios chip in my laptop. So that should be no problem here. So please get back to me soon. So thank you very much! Angry Sad
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#2
One of the first hurdles with modding Insyde bios was bypassing this message, "The Bios image is corrupt or does not contain the correct digital signature. The system BIOS will not be updated." This would occur whenever I tried to flash modified bios.

After disassembling iscflash.dll. I could see that this string was called in three different places for InsydeFlash V4.04.00 (It's different for each revision). After modifying those three places, It became possible to flash modified bios Big Grin



While examining iscflash.dll, I noticed that it contains all the warning/errors that occur when trying to flash bios. So to bypass any of them, all you have to do is edit this file.

This shouldn't be too hard to modify iscflash.dll to ignore the fact that your trying to flash bios not for your laptop. Even though I highly recommend that you only flash bios what were designed for your system, I think it would be interesting to see your results Smile
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#3
So how do I do this? All I have to do is to edit the iscflash.dll file? But how do I that? Should I use a hex editor to edit it? I am not sure on how to do this process. I just want to rid of that "This Bios Is Not For Your Notebook PC." So I want to totally get rid of this annoying message. I want to try to download the bios from the Acer Aspire 5742G model. And if I can get this to work, I will be happy for sure. Just please give me step-by-step instructions on how to do this for me, so I can understand this more clearly. So get back to me soon on this. So thank you very much!
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#4
Yep, all you have to do is edit the iscflash.dll file.

Here' a step-by-step process:
1. Disassemble the iscflash.dll file.
2. Find out what function in the dissembled code it's giving you the "This Bios Is Not For Your Notebook PC" error.
3. Find out what subroutine is calling that function
4. Change the code in that subroutine so that it doesn't call that function (Most likely all you have to do it change the type of conditional jump or replace a conditional statement with nops).

Hope that clears things up Smile
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#5
Question 
Thank you for getting back to me. But I am still confused about this. I do not even know what a subroutine is, and I do not even know on what a conditional jump or a conditional statement with nops is! And what is a dissembled code? And what does does it look like? Because I have like no idea on what that looks like. I really do need some screenshots on how to do this, because the step-by-step instructions were sort of complicated for me. I am sorry about. Like I didn't get on how to do them. So if you can get back to me soon, I would appreciate that very much from you. And try to give me some screenshots on how to do this for me. So please get back to me soon. I will be waiting for my response from you very soon. So thank you very much! Huh
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#6
(04-22-2013, 06:02 PM)jordanlg48 Wrote: Thank you for getting back to me. But I am still confused about this. I do not even know what a subroutine is, and I do not even know on what a conditional jump or a conditional statement with nops is! And what is a dissembled code? And what does does it look like? Because I have like no idea on what that looks like. I really do need some screenshots on how to do this, because the step-by-step instructions were sort of complicated for me. I am sorry about. Like I didn't get on how to do them. So if you can get back to me soon, I would appreciate that very much from you. And try to give me some screenshots on how to do this for me. So please get back to me soon. I will be waiting for my response from you very soon. So thank you very much! Huh

hi man
i am not an expert in disassembly...but i recommend you to google Assembly language
disassembly is used in reverse engineering (like cracking an patching softwares)
i personnaly know two disassemblers "win32dasm" and "ollydbg" you can google for them and google how to use them.
good luck
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#7
(04-22-2013, 06:02 PM)jordanlg48 Wrote: Thank you for getting back to me. But I am still confused about this. I do not even know what a subroutine is, and I do not even know on what a conditional jump or a conditional statement with nops is! And what is a dissembled code? And what does does it look like? Because I have like no idea on what that looks like. I really do need some screenshots on how to do this, because the step-by-step instructions were sort of complicated for me. I am sorry about. Like I didn't get on how to do them. So if you can get back to me soon, I would appreciate that very much from you. And try to give me some screenshots on how to do this for me. So please get back to me soon. I will be waiting for my response from you very soon. So thank you very much! Huh

Lol, you've clearly never done anything like this before Tongue Good luck. I'd recommend you read some books on the 64-bit Intel assembly language and reverse engineering software. I'll try to explain some basic stuff to clear up the confusion.


Have you ever done any programming in higher-level languages like C/C++, Java, Objective-C, etc? If so, then it's easy to convert that knowledge to assembly. (If you haven't then go look up a few tutorials of C++)


A subroutine is just another name for a function (its just common to refer to functions in asm as subroutines). If, for, while, and do while statements are conditional statements. They are used to determine what to do under certain conditions. So by changing these conditions, you can make a program behave differently. Here's an example in pseudo code:

Here the conditional statement checks if the light is off, the calls the goToSleep subroutine:

If lightSwitch is OFF, then goToSleep

Here we modified the conditional statement in order to make the program behave differently. GoToSleep will now be called under the opposite conditions.

If lightSwitch is ON, then goToSleep


Nop is the operation code (op-code) for no operation. It tells your computer to not do anything for one machine cycle. If you completely replace a conditional statement with nops, then you can make a program behave differently. Here's an example:

Same thing blah:
If lightSwitch is OFF, then goToSleep

Here we noped over the conditional statement in order to make the program behave differently. Now goToSleep will always be called.

NOP NOP NOP NOP NOP goToSleep


Make sure you understand how useful these two techniques are. They are invaluable when in comes to controlling the flow of a program. And this is the main goal your trying to accomplish.


The process of converting code into an executable is called compiling. When code is compiled, it is broken down into asm then into an executable (It is vastly more complicated than that but it gets the point across). The process of converting asm code into an executable is called assembling. From this you should be able to determine what disassembling means; it's the process of converting an executable back into asm code. So disassembled code just looks like asm code. There are many different disassemblers around, but the best is IDA pro.

You wanted a screenshot, well here's a screenshot. Shows C and asm code that both display a "Disassemble Me" string. The third picture is part of the disassembled code generated by IDA pro. As you can see it doesn't look anything like the original code. That's just how modern day compilers and assemblers work.

[Image: 2db8k0n.png]

Programs are broken into several sections, the most important being the code and data sections. The data section contains all the strings and variables used, while the code section contains the instructions that the program executes. Inside iscflash.dll's data section there is your enemy, the "This Bios Is Not For Your Notebook PC" string. You need to find out what subroutine in the code section is using that string. Once that's found, you must find a way to bypass it (possibly using the techniques mentioned above).

Feel free to keep asking questions. I'll try to get on here at least once a day. Don't ever feel like a nuisance, the best way to learn something new is by asking others. Communities like this one would be nothing if its users didn't pass along their knowledge to others. I know I didn't really get into how to physically modify the file, but I'll explain that when you get there. This isn't a difficult task for your first attempt at modifying software. You can accomplish this without much difficulties Big Grin
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#8
Question 
Wow, this seems to help me out now, as far as the letter goes. I think I might know on what to do now. So I will try to get this working. Oh on my older computer I have a Dell Dimension 4600. And do you know if there is a way to download a modified bios on my Dimension? Because I do not have that many options for Power in my bios setup. I have a Power Management section, but I only have S3 for Sleep, and S4 for hibernation, I think. And I also have a low power mode, enable or disable.


Now whenever I try to download a different bios for another Dell Dimension model or even an Optiplex, I get a message that says "Notice!, Running on an unsupported system." So that is what is says on my Dell Dimension now. But my Acer Aspire said 'This bios is not for your notebook PC." So it says "running on an supported system," which is annoying too. So is there any way to bypass this like on my Aspire 5733z laptop?



And how do I edit this file? Do the Dell systems have an Iscflash.dll file or not? Because the Iscflash.dll file could only be for Insyde bios chips only. But not my Dell. My Dell bios has a Phoenix-Dell bios, they call it. So that would be Phoenix and Dell together. My bios is like a grey screen with white text and it highlights like a purple color. My bios is very tight when it comes to certain options though, which is kind of annoying, and a pain. But I don't worry about that for now. So just let me know about that when you get back to me. Thank you.



And now, I was just wondering if I download a certain driver for another Acer model laptop, let's say I wanted to download a driver from an Acer Timeline laptop. And I have read online that some of these laptops come with VPro technology on the Cpu. So those Acer Timeline laptops must have a Core i7 processor or they must have Core 2 Duo in them. But I looked on the Intel site, and it said that that these laptops have VPro technology on them.


So it must have an i7 Cpu, which is quad-core. And I was just wondering, let's say I downloaded the Vpro driver for that laptop, (but not for my model) and it would probably say it would not install and then the driver setup would exit out on me, which would be not good at all. But what if I wanted to install that driver on my laptop, even though it was not made for my laptop? Because I only have a Pentium 6200 dual core Cpu on my Acer Aspire 5733z. So is there like a way to open up the Vpro driver, and edit it in ASM, or something like that you told me about? And then I can find the codes in the editor, and go from there, if I know what to do.


And then maybe I can see the results after I edit it, and see if I can get the VPro technology to work on my Acer Aspire laptop. That would cool to see. Because now of these days you can do anything you want with computers. So there you have it. I know this is a long letter, but you get the point. But I really want to be more interested in this, as you can see. So please get back to me as soon as you can, like tomorrow is all right with me. I am really wondering on how this will work out for me. So don't forget to get back to me as soon as possible. So thank you very much!Huh Big Grin
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#9
Your Dell Dimension 4600 uses Phoenix bios. I only have experience with Insyde bios, so I can't help you there. Try the Phoenix bios forum on this website for help with that. If you want to modify Dell Dimension bios yourself then use the techniques I mentioned last time. All you'd have to do it reverse engineer the phoenix flash utility and modify it to support modified bios. Then reverse engineer the bios rom and modify it to what you want changed in your bios.

Most likely the way I described to you about bypassing the "This bios is not for your notebook PC" error can be used to bypass the "running on an unsupported system" error. Why do want to flash your Dell Dimension with bios that weren't made for it? Your bios contains all your computers basic I/O subroutines. It allows software to communicate with your hardware. I doubt your going to get the results your expecting when flashing foreign bios into your system. Your more than likely going to do is brick your laptop, and then you'll have to recover it.

Phoenix bios don't have an Iscflash.dll. This is unique Insyde's flash tools. I don't know anything about Phoenix bios.

Vpro is something that you processor's hardware enables your laptop to use. Your processor doesn't have support for it, so you will never be able to use it. It still wouldn't work even if you could get the drivers to install. I have a similar problem with my laptop and AES encryption. Unfortunately my processor doesn't support AES encryption, so there is no way for me to use this feature Sad
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#10
(04-23-2013, 11:51 PM)donovan6000 Wrote: Your Dell Dimension 4600 uses Phoenix bios. I only have experience with Insyde bios, so I can't help you there. Try the Phoenix bios forum on this website for help with that. If you want to modify Dell Dimension bios yourself then use the techniques I mentioned last time. All you'd have to do it reverse engineer the phoenix flash utility and modify it to support modified bios. Then reverse engineer the bios rom and modify it to what you want changed in your bios.

Most likely the way I described to you about bypassing the "This bios is not for your notebook PC" error can be used to bypass the "running on an unsupported system" error. Why do want to flash your Dell Dimension with bios that weren't made for it? Your bios contains all your computers basic I/O subroutines. It allows software to communicate with your hardware. I doubt your going to get the results your expecting when flashing foreign bios into your system. Your more than likely going to do is brick your laptop, and then you'll have to recover it.

Phoenix bios don't have an Iscflash.dll. This is unique Insyde's flash tools. I don't know anything about Phoenix bios.

Vpro is something that you processor's hardware enables your laptop to use. Your processor doesn't have support for it, so you will never be able to use it. It still wouldn't work even if you could get the drivers to install. I have a similar problem with my laptop and AES encryption. Unfortunately my processor doesn't support AES encryption, so there is no way for me to use this feature Sad
I have a TOSHIBA SATELLITE L850-Y5310. It has InsydeH20BIOS v6.70. I need to overclock my CPU through BIOS. Is it possible if yes, then how ?
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