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[REQUEST] Asus ROG G771JM bios unlock
#31
(04-21-2018, 05:02 AM)Lamestpw Wrote: I´m hoping to use a Samsung 960 EVO SSD M.2 2280 as boot/OS-drive in my ASUS G771JM laptop.
The drive is recognized in Windows 10 (from another bootable-drive) and can be formatted but I can´t make it bootable.
Does feluchi´s modified BIOS help?

[*]Important:
  • The "BOOT" section of the UEFI BIOS and the shortcut to the "Bootable Devices" will not show the NVMe SSD, although it may be bootable!
  • After having installed the NVMe supporting OS in UEFI mode onto the PCIe/M.2 connected SSD, you will see the new bootable system drive listed as "Windows Boot Manager".

[*]Here are some advices about how to get Win10 properly installed onto an M.2 or PCIe connected NVMe SSD:
  • Save the important data, which are currently on the NVMe SSD.
  • Create a bootable, FAT32 formatted USB Flash drive containing the desired Win10 image by using the tool Rufus (important: choose the UEFI mode partition table = GPT).
    Here is a picture, which shows the most important Rufus settings:
    [Image: f50t871p14810n38_OuVTrMzF-thumb.png]
  • Enter the BIOS and navigate to the "BOOT" section and - if applicable - the "SECURITY" or "Keys" section. 
    Make sure, that the "Secure Boot" and "Fast Boot" options are disabled. The "Compatibility Support Module" (CSM) should be set to "Disabled" as well (requires full UEFI compatibility of the graphics adapter) or to "Enabled" with the ability/preference to load EFI BIOS modules for the Storage Disk Drives.
    Side note: Some users reported, they they had to disable the ASMedia SATA Controller within the "Storage Configuration" section to be able to boot off the NVMe SSD.
  • Most important: Unplug all storage disk drives except the NVMe supporting SSD.
  • Insert the prepared USB Flash drive and boot off it in UEFI mode (the related bootable USB drive should be shown by the Boot Manager with the prefix "[UEFI]").
  • When you come to the point, where you have to decide onto which Drive and which partition the OS shall be installed, delete all existing partitions from your NVME supporting SSD. After having done that, let the Win10 Setup create a new partition for your future drive C: on the related SSD. Then point to this just created partition as the desired future OS location.
  • The rest should be done by the Setup automaticly. You will get a message, that some additional partitions have to be created. Accept that and follow the advice of the Setup where to install the OS.
  • Once the OS is up and running, shut down the computer, remove the bootable USB Flash driver and reconnect all your previously used storage drives.
  • Before you restart cour computer, make sure, that the NVMe SSD resp. its listed "Windows Boot Manager" is on top of the bootable storage drives.
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quote
#32
(04-21-2018, 07:02 AM)feluchi Wrote:
(04-21-2018, 05:02 AM)Lamestpw Wrote: I´m hoping to use a Samsung 960 EVO SSD M.2 2280 as boot/OS-drive in my ASUS G771JM laptop.
The drive is recognized in Windows 10 (from another bootable-drive) and can be formatted but I can´t make it bootable.
Does feluchi´s modified BIOS help?

[*]Important:
  • The "BOOT" section of the UEFI BIOS and the shortcut to the "Bootable Devices" will not show the NVMe SSD, although it may be bootable!
  • After having installed the NVMe supporting OS in UEFI mode onto the PCIe/M.2 connected SSD, you will see the new bootable system drive listed as "Windows Boot Manager".


[*]Here are some advices about how to get Win10 properly installed onto an M.2 or PCIe connected NVMe SSD:
  • Save the important data, which are currently on the NVMe SSD.
  • Create a bootable, FAT32 formatted USB Flash drive containing the desired Win10 image by using the tool Rufus (important: choose the UEFI mode partition table = GPT).
    Here is a picture, which shows the most important Rufus settings:
    [Image: f50t871p14810n38_OuVTrMzF-thumb.png]
  • Enter the BIOS and navigate to the "BOOT" section and - if applicable - the "SECURITY" or "Keys" section. 
    Make sure, that the "Secure Boot" and "Fast Boot" options are disabled. The "Compatibility Support Module" (CSM) should be set to "Disabled" as well (requires full UEFI compatibility of the graphics adapter) or to "Enabled" with the ability/preference to load EFI BIOS modules for the Storage Disk Drives.
    Side note: Some users reported, they they had to disable the ASMedia SATA Controller within the "Storage Configuration" section to be able to boot off the NVMe SSD.
  • Most important: Unplug all storage disk drives except the NVMe supporting SSD.
  • Insert the prepared USB Flash drive and boot off it in UEFI mode (the related bootable USB drive should be shown by the Boot Manager with the prefix "[UEFI]").
  • When you come to the point, where you have to decide onto which Drive and which partition the OS shall be installed, delete all existing partitions from your NVME supporting SSD. After having done that, let the Win10 Setup create a new partition for your future drive C: on the related SSD. Then point to this just created partition as the desired future OS location.
  • The rest should be done by the Setup automaticly. You will get a message, that some additional partitions have to be created. Accept that and follow the advice of the Setup where to install the OS.
  • Once the OS is up and running, shut down the computer, remove the bootable USB Flash driver and reconnect all your previously used storage drives.
  • Before you restart cour computer, make sure, that the NVMe SSD resp. its listed "Windows Boot Manager" is on top of the bootable storage drives.
[*]
WOW!  What a nice surprice, exactly what I was hoping for - a step by step instruction that I can follow (almost 70 y old guy..) I will try this and let you know how it pans out. Thanks a lot!
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quote
#33
(04-21-2018, 07:58 AM)Lamestpw Wrote:
(04-21-2018, 07:02 AM)feluchi Wrote:
(04-21-2018, 05:02 AM)Lamestpw Wrote: I´m hoping to use a Samsung 960 EVO SSD M.2 2280 as boot/OS-drive in my ASUS G771JM laptop.
The drive is recognized in Windows 10 (from another bootable-drive) and can be formatted but I can´t make it bootable.
Does feluchi´s modified BIOS help?

[*]Important:
  • The "BOOT" section of the UEFI BIOS and the shortcut to the "Bootable Devices" will not show the NVMe SSD, although it may be bootable!
  • After having installed the NVMe supporting OS in UEFI mode onto the PCIe/M.2 connected SSD, you will see the new bootable system drive listed as "Windows Boot Manager".



[*]Here are some advices about how to get Win10 properly installed onto an M.2 or PCIe connected NVMe SSD:
  • Save the important data, which are currently on the NVMe SSD.
  • Create a bootable, FAT32 formatted USB Flash drive containing the desired Win10 image by using the tool Rufus (important: choose the UEFI mode partition table = GPT).
    Here is a picture, which shows the most important Rufus settings:
    [Image: f50t871p14810n38_OuVTrMzF-thumb.png]
  • Enter the BIOS and navigate to the "BOOT" section and - if applicable - the "SECURITY" or "Keys" section. 
    Make sure, that the "Secure Boot" and "Fast Boot" options are disabled. The "Compatibility Support Module" (CSM) should be set to "Disabled" as well (requires full UEFI compatibility of the graphics adapter) or to "Enabled" with the ability/preference to load EFI BIOS modules for the Storage Disk Drives.
    Side note: Some users reported, they they had to disable the ASMedia SATA Controller within the "Storage Configuration" section to be able to boot off the NVMe SSD.
  • Most important: Unplug all storage disk drives except the NVMe supporting SSD.
  • Insert the prepared USB Flash drive and boot off it in UEFI mode (the related bootable USB drive should be shown by the Boot Manager with the prefix "[UEFI]").
  • When you come to the point, where you have to decide onto which Drive and which partition the OS shall be installed, delete all existing partitions from your NVME supporting SSD. After having done that, let the Win10 Setup create a new partition for your future drive C: on the related SSD. Then point to this just created partition as the desired future OS location.
  • The rest should be done by the Setup automaticly. You will get a message, that some additional partitions have to be created. Accept that and follow the advice of the Setup where to install the OS.
  • Once the OS is up and running, shut down the computer, remove the bootable USB Flash driver and reconnect all your previously used storage drives.
  • Before you restart cour computer, make sure, that the NVMe SSD resp. its listed "Windows Boot Manager" is on top of the bootable storage drives.
[*]
WOW!  What a nice surprice, exactly what I was hoping for - a step by step instruction that I can follow (almost 70 y old guy..) I will try this and let you know how it pans out. Thanks a lot!
[*]
After several failed attempts I can see that there is an installation to the NVMe SSD to the tune of 8,65 Gb but every attempt goes like this:
Files are written to the ONLY drive on the computer: 250Gb NVMe SSD.
Installation reboots and start all over again. (Normally the installation would continue from the harddrive and not from the USB-memory?)
I did follow the instructions you gave me - adamantly.
I tried taking the USB-memory out when the installation reboots but the BIOS haven´t found the NVMe SSD at that point.
If I let the USB-memory with the ISO-image stay during reboot, the windows-installation just starts over.
As for getting any message during installation that partitions are being created, I´m afraid that´s not the case for me. I get one message showing that a partition is being created on NVMe SSD and I just confirm that suggestion.
I hope I have covered my predicament somewhat..
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#34
Returned the M.2 SSD...
Thanks for the help.
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#35
I flashed the file posted here and it worked!! I can go over 85C now. Before I couldn't play on high performance power plan because it keeps on stuttering. Now I had the option to turn of Cpu C state and turbo boost. Smooth as butter now. This is what kind of performance I was expecting when I bought this laptop. After 2 years of frustation. Thank you @bandig9229!!!
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#36
Hello,
Can anyone send me a modified bios version 2.03. Like everyone, I have problems with lowering the clock speed of the CPU due to temperature.
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#37
(08-22-2018, 12:15 PM)esnaider Wrote: Hello,
Can anyone send me a modified bios version 2.03. Like everyone, I have problems with lowering the clock speed of the CPU due to temperature.

Hi! Check your PM.
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#38
Hello Feluchi,
can I ask for the modded BIOS for G771JW? I believe its the same as G771JM. Thanks in advance!
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#39
(11-22-2018, 12:05 PM)k4milt Wrote: Hello Feluchi,
can I ask for the modded BIOS for G771JW? I believe its the same as G771JM. Thanks in advance!

Hi! Check your PM.
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#40
Hi Feluchi.

Can you confirm if you can mod the BIOS/VBIOS for the G771JW?

I am having the same problems as many others with the CPU/GPU throttling severely during gaming or stress testing. From looking at GPU-Z I can see that the 960m GPU starts out at around 1100Mhz and by the time it gets stable under full load it has throttled down to 600Mhz or less with spikes along the way down to 135Mhz!

I temporarily connected a large extraction fan to the exhaust vent on the laptop and got temps WELL down (under 70 C at full load) but it still throttles down to 600Mhz with the reason coming up as power limit instead of thermal limit in GPU-Z.

The laptop has a larger power supply (9.5A vs 6.32A original) and I plan to install a more permanent cooling system extraction fan to boost cooling performance.

So far I have seen several suggestions including undervolting the CPU, running throttlestop and BIOS modifications but can't quite wrap my head around if one or all of these things are required.

Any advise is much appreciated.
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